The 5 Best Beginner Dive Sites around Amed

Blessed with clear visibility and a large variety of marine creatures: The area surrounding the little fishing village of Amed makes every divers heart beat go faster.
The north eastern coastline of Bali is packed with endless coral reefs. Dozens of bays string together forming Balis largest dive area. From Padang-Bay through Gili Selang up to Amed and Tulamben you could literally jump into the water and dive. This abundance of sites can be overwhelming, therefor we will share the 5 best dive sites for beginners with you.


1. USAT Liberty Shipwreck (Tulamben)

Depth: 5-35 meters
Access: Shore
Level: Beginner

The areas most famous dive site claimed its reputation for a reason. USAT Liberty was an American war vessel during the second world war. The ship got torpedoed by the Japanese towards the end of WW2 close to the Komodo Islands. Upon it’s sinking the ship got pulled to the island of Bali where allied forces beached the vessel on Tulambens shore. The Liberty remained stranded there for many years while being scavenged by the local community. The eruption of the massive volcano “Mt. Agung” in 1963 forced the vessel underwater where it lies up to this day. Over the years the wreck became a heavenly paradise for marine life. The whole ship is covered in different types of hard and soft corals. This coral city invites an astonishing variety of marine creatures to settle. Most famously known is a family of Humphead Parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) residing in the shipwreck at night, whilst grazing on the surrounding coral reefs during the day.

2. Pyramids (Amed, Tukatse)

Depth: 5-25 meters
Access: Shore/Boat
Level: Beginners to Advanced

This dive site in the heart of Amed is a pure gem. Along the large coral reef lie artificial coral constructions in the shape of pyramids. The reef itself ranges from a depth of 5 to 20 meters and is home to a variety of coral fish (Angle Fish, Butterfly Fish…). Alongside the reef on a depth of 18-25 meters about 20 large pyramids align them selves. Over the years the pyramids allowed plenty of corals to grow on them. With corals came a diversity of schooling fish (fusiliers, goat fish…). Additionally, every pyramid is home to a slightly different type of coral. Some of them are inhabited by large fan corals, others by table corals and some are home to a mix of different hard and soft coral species. This site can attract pelagic marine animals like hammerhead sharks, schools of barracudas and sometimes even whale sharks.

3. Amed Wall & Jemeluk Bay (Amed, Jemeluk)


Depth: 3-55 meters
Access: Shore
Level: Beginners, Advanced and Professional

The best place to learn diving in Amed. In the shallow areas of the bay, right off-shore, beginners can perfectly accomplish their Open Water Course. By venturing out towards the right side of the bay you will eventually reach the famously known “Amed Wall” – a beautiful wall dive site ranging from 10-45 meters. The wall is covered in all types of coral. You can find gigantic sponges, gorgeous fan corals and large table corals. On days of clear visibility you will be astonished by the beautiful landscape.

4. Drop Off (Tulamben)

Depth: 5-60 meters
Access: Shore
Level: Beginners, Advanced and Professional

Even though this dive site is dropping very deep, beginners can enjoy the feeling of flying along the shallower parts of the wall. The Tulamben Drop Off is quite different to the Wall in Amed. Different types of corals can be found. Also the marine life in this part of the coast varies from the one found in Amed. Just because the site is reaching very deep it doesn’t mean that the area from 5-18 meters has nothing to offer. A school of fusiliers is stationary living at the very beginning of the dive site. The Drop Off is also home to an abundance of macro marine life. Nudibranchs in all shapes and sizes can be encountered here. Don’t spread the word to loud but there have even been recent sightings of Whale Sharks right here!

5. Japanese Shipwreck (Amed)


Depth: 3-30 meters
Access: Shore
Level: Beginners

Among dive professionals in the area this site is known as a paradise for microscopic marine creatures. The wreck is considerably small and lies very shallow just in front the shore. Despite its small size it is home to dozens of nudibranchs, ghost pipefishes and coral fish. Beginners love this wreck as it is easily accessible and shallow. The reef surrounding the shipwreck is worth another whole dive itself. Pristine corals, thousands of different species of fish and the notoriously known “Pigmy Seahorse” can be found here. To find this very small seahorse you definitely need very good eyes or a dive buddy specialised in finding them!

Sequential Hermaphroditism

Did you know that some aquatic species can change from male to female and vice versa?

Nudibranchs are hermaphroditic, too. On the picture above you can see two “nembrotha lineolatas” exchanging eggs and semen. During the mating process most nudibranch connect to each other sideways.

This phenomenon is called sequential hermaphroditism and describes a type of hermaphroditism that occurs in many fish, snails, slugs (yes, nudibranchs are hermaphroditic as well), and even some plants. We speak of sequential hermaphroditism when the individual changes its sex at some point in its life. Species that can undergo these changes from one sex to another do so as a normal event within their reproductive cycle that is usually cued by either social structure or the achievement of a certain age or size. Oftentimes this happens to ensure successful reproduction.

Clownfish are one of the most famous sequential hermaphrodites. Clownfish are all born male, but can change their sex to female if the necessity occurs. They for example change their sex from male to female when there is no other female to mate with or when they attain a certain size. (By the way, this would’ve changed the entire plot of Nemo.)

This phenomenon goes the other way as well.

Unlike clownfish that start life as males and transform into females, there are other species, such as the California sheephead, that start as female and transform into male.